link to RWJMS home page
banner

Microbiology and Immunology, MSBS 5055S
Course Director:  Dr. Lee Ann Schein

Dept. of Pharmacology

scheinla@rwjms.rutgers.edu

 

 

Course Syllabus

 

Note: this course is a subsection of the RWJMS First Year Med course "Disease and Defense"


Our course is governed by the idea that a physician should understand the cellular and molecular processes of infectious disease, and not simply match organisms and antibiotics. It covers the common micro-organisms which cause human disease and the immune system which defends us against them. Lectures will deal with the most important concepts and facts; much material will be dealt with in independent study. Our course focuses on microbes and their interaction with the body.

Course Content:

Immunology: cells and tissues of the immune system and their roles in health and disease.

Innate and acquired immunity. Cells and organs of the immune system and their functions and interactions; antigens and their presentation; structure, function, and diversity of antibodies; complement; major histocompatibility complex [MHC] and its roles; CD surface antigens; antigen presentation, lymphocyte development and activation, phagocytes and other mechanisms of immune defense against infection; inflammation; hypersensitivity reactions; immune tolerance; immunology of blood transfusion and transplantation.

Pathogenic Micro-organisms: their structure, biology, and roles in disease; prevention and control of infections.

Antimicrobial agents: Structure and modes of action of anti-microbial drugs, and mechanisms by which microbes become resistant to them; phagocytic cells and their roles in antimicrobial defense.

Bacteria: Classification, structure, nutrition, physiology, and growth of bacteria; virulence factors; bacterial genetics; genetic basis of virulence; antibiotics, their modes of action and the biochemistry and genetics of resistance; diagnostic bacteriology; sterilization and disinfection; properties of the major bacterial pathogens of humans, including morphology and staining properties, virulence factors and pathogenesis, reservoirs, vectors, routes of transmission; major diseases and symptoms, important antibiotic sensitivities, vaccines and preventive measures.

Protozoa: Major protozoan infections of humans; their agents, geographic distribution, life cycles, reservoirs, vectors, pathogenesis, prophylactic measures, and available drug therapy.

Fungi: Structure and biology of the fungal cell; diagnosis of fungal infections; staining techniques, culture, and morphology; properties of the major fungal pathogens of humans, including identification, major diseases and symptoms, important drugs.

Viruses: Structure, replication, culture, and identification of viruses; diagnosis of viral infections; antiviral drugs; major pathogenic viruses of humans; their structure, replication cycle, pathogenesis, diseases and symptoms, available drugs and vaccines; unconventional virus-like infectious agents; interferons and their actions.

Goals and Objectives:

Demonstrate knowledge of the cells and organs of the immune system and their roles in health and disease, including: antigens and epitopes; structure and function of antibodies; Complement; tissues and organs of the immune system; roles of its important cell types and subtypes and how they are identified and quantitated; the genetic basis of immunoglobulin structure and diversity; the major histocompatibility complex and its roles; phagocytes and other mechanisms of innate immune defense against infection; mechanisms of acquired immune defense; immunodeficiency states; inflammation and hypersensitivity reactions; mechanisms of immune tolerance; immunological aspects of blood transfusion and organ transplantation; immunization and types of vaccines.

Demonstrate knowledge of the major microbial pathogens of humans:

Bacteria: their classification, structure, nutrition, physiology, and genetics; genetic basis of virulence; antibiotics, their modes of action and the biochemistry and genetics of resistance; methods of diagnostic bacteriology; important bacterial pathogens of humans, including their morphology and staining properties; virulence factors and pathogenesis; risk factors for infection; habitats, reservoirs, vectors, and routes of transmission; major diseases and symptoms; important antibiotic sensitivities and resistances; vaccines and preventive measures.

Protozoa: important human pathogens; their geographic distribution, life cycles, reservoirs, vectors; diseases and symptoms, prophylactic measures, and available drugs.

Fungi: classification and morphology of fungi; anti-fungal drugs; methods for diagnosis of fungal infections, staining techniques, culture, serology; important fungal pathogens of humans: morphology, major diseases and symptoms, risk factors for infection.

Viruses: their structure, replication, culture; methods for diagnosis of viral infections; anti-viral drugs; important pathogenic viruses of humans: their structures, replication cycles, features that promote virulence; diseases and symptoms, available drugs and vaccines; prions; interferons and their actions.